Distant Beings and Falling Stars on Offer

To celebrate the release of THE TRUTH OF DIFFERENT SKIES this week, both THE LONELINESS OF DISTANT BEINGS and THE GLOW OF FALLEN STARS are now 99p on ebook for Kindle (in the UK).  Bargains!  I know deals like this are always music to my ears, so I thought I’d spread the joy.  This means that during the whole of the very merry month of May, you can complete your Ventura Saga collection for less than a tenner!  You can’t say fairer than that.  Follow the links below to make your wise purchases

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Loneliness-Distant-Beings-Book-Ventura-ebook/dp/B0119EPOKQ/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1525179553&sr=8-1

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ventura-Saga-Glow-Fallen-Stars-ebook/dp/B071LM6Z5K/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1525179613&sr=1-1&keywords=glow+of+fallen+stars&dpID=61V7yI9kXVL&preST=_SY445_QL70_&dpSrc=srch

The Soundtracks of Different Skies

My Spotify soundtracks for the Ventura series are a combination of:

  • songs I listened to a lot while writing the books
  • songs that (lyrically or musically) fit with the narrative and mood of the story.
  • songs that feature on my fantasy soundtrack for the movie adaptations that I daydream about ALL THE TIME. Can’t even tell you how much time I spend on this. It would be embarrassing to admit it.

Most of the time it’s a combination of all of the above. Either way, these are the songs that have come to be associated with my books, for me anyway, and every time I hear them I’m right there, watching the non-existent movie adaptations as they play on the big silver screen in my mind.

I’ve just finished putting together the latest, for THE TRUTH OF DIFFERENT SKIES (out this Thursday – squeeeeeee!).  One of the characters in this part of the series has an obsession with the late seventies, and most of the songs in this playlist from that era are about breaking free. The others contain the pain and longing and heat and desire that this story is imbued with throughout.  It can be found on the link below and should be listened to while reading, after reading, or just whenever you’re in the mood.  I mean, I have pretty great taste in music so – believe me – you can’t go too far wrong.

All Roads Lead to Ventura

So here’s a question I keep getting asked… Is THE TRUTH OF DIFFERENT SKIES:

a) a prequel?

b) a standalone?

c) the first part of the Ventura series?

d) the final part of the Ventura series?

The answer, my friends, is both far more complicated and surprisingly simple. And it is:

e) all of the above.

Right from the start, I have always known the Ventura’s origin story would have to be told. THE LONELINESS OF DISTANT BEINGS took us right into the middle of the Ventura’s several-hundred year mission so that, like main protagonist Seren, we are thrown into this rootless existence, hurtling through space in a tin can with no context, no history, no connection and also no hope of seeing the final destination. I wanted the reader to feel that lack of any past or any future beyond the walls of the Ventura, to experience that claustrophobia first hand.

In THE TRUTH OF DIFFERENT SKIES the main character is also trapped, albeit in a different way. Bea, great grandmother to Seren, and potential Ventura recruit, is working full time while still at school in the rural Wales of 2050, where life is tough and uncompromising, and going nowhere fast.

Like Seren, Bea knows very little about love. But where Seren’s family life is all about structure, to the point where she feels there’s no space for real feelings, Bea’s family has no structure, no stability, and has been blown apart by the mess and havoc wreaked by the randomness of human emotion. All Bea knows about love is that it’s destructive, that it ends badly, that it can go unreturned and eat you up inside.

These aren’t the only ways in which Bea’s life is an inside-out mirror to Seren’s, but to say any more would provide too many spoilers all round. Suffice it to say that the series as a whole, and each part within it, are, at heart, about feeling trapped and finding a way to freedom. They are about main characters who are brave, determined, and who overcome obstacles and take repeated steps into the unknown in the quest for the future they know is right for them. They are about loss, agency, sacrifice, following your dreams, desire, growing up, being flawed, living with an invisible illness, what makes us human, and the unpredictable and uncertain beauty of love.

I love a beautifully rendered trilogy but, if you’re not careful, they can be predictable, or they can run out of steam. With my all-of-the-above third entry I was aiming to try something a little different. Why not make a series where, like one of those ‘Choose Your Own Adventure Books’ from the eighties, you can find your own way into the story, following the clues and finding the links between the three, creating your own route through to the end? After all, writing a story is only ever half of the process. It only lives once its playing in the mind of the reader, like a movie on a screen, and I love the idea that his story could live in more ways than just one.

Originally written for Bkmrk, and appearing here https://bkmrk.co.uk/kate-ling-why-a-prequel/

My Summer as Charles Dickens

Wow, I have loved being on Wattpad.  From a bit of initial scepticism (feeling like I was falling down rabbitholes of soft porn every time I went on there) (not that that’s necessarily a bad thing) I have become a real convert to this amazingly supportive and productive community.  I love hearing people’s thoughts on my book in real time, as they read it.  I love answering questions, seeing which bits they think are funny, what resonates with them.  I also really got a kick out of getting to be Charles Dickens for a summer – serialising my book one chapter at a time and really getting the most out of my mini cliffhangers!  I’m evil like that.

Loneliness is now on up on Wattpad in its entirety, and  I am in the process of posting The Glow of Fallen Stars at the moment.  Chapter Four will go up tomorrow to celebrate the release of the book itself, and I will stop there, apart from adding some exclusive deleted scenes from The Loneliness of Distant Beings over the coming weeks.  There may not be DVDs any more, but I’m still calling them my DVD extras.  I’m retro.

I think I’ll probably write more about Wattpad, and the stories and netherworlds I discovered while wandering the labyrinthine hallways of its fanfic, once I’ve got more time, but for now I’m off to finish posting – I’m starting a competition tomorrow asking what song would feature on a soundtrack to The Loneliness of Distant Beings – should be fun!

Book Review: Hold Back The Stars

I’m a sucker for any book about space (and, as I’ve proven lately, for any book with the word ‘star’ or ‘stars’ in the title) but I genuinely was particularly excited to read Katie Khan’s HOLD BACK THE STARS when I spotted it on NetGalley.  Like many, I went into it thinking it was YA… it turns out it’s not, strictly speaking, but as the author itself says it deals with the kind of themes that are relevant to YA readers (first love, commitment, choices) so could as easily be enjoyed by them as by an older demographic.  I’d like to think that this kind of category-defying/crossover book might be a further step on the path to a more open view of books and readerships and who can enjoy what… but that’s probably a discussion for another day.

To return to the matter in hand, HOLD BACK THE STARS concerns the story of Max and Carys (girls with Welsh names in space is another thing I’m particularly keen on!).  They are freefalling in space after a spacewalk gone wrong, with nobody to help them and certain death on the cards, with only ninety minutes of air.  While this predicament unfurls we are told the story of their complicated relationship in flashback, through which we also gain insight into a future Planet Earth – its society, its rules, its philosophy – and the impact all of these have on the real people that live on it.

This is a richly detailed and expertly realised world, and I am fully aware of the the complexities of this kind of world-building, having just been neck-deep in it while writing my third book.  It’s thoughtful and interesting while also, I felt, managing to raise debate-provoking questions about our own society and the decisions and directions currently being taken.  The structure is fascinating, disorientating and very well executed, building suspense and taking VERY unexpected turns before bringing us into land.  Like I said I think this is a book that could have a very broad appeal; it’s not easy to pigeonhole or label but I think that was one of the things I liked most about it.  There are readers of many ages and demographic factors who will thoroughly enjoy this book, and I was most certainly one of them.

Thanks to NetGalley for the eARC.

More reviews on my blog http://kateling.co.uk/blog/

Book Review: When We Collided

cover-for-when-we-collidedI thought it couldn’t get any better than the depiction of bipolar disorder in All the Bright Places, and maybe it doesn’t. But if there ever was a contender, it could be right here, in the beauteous, luminous When We Collided.

In it we are transported to a small, pretty coastal town where enigmatic, charismatic mini-Marilyn Vivi meets sensitive, handsome Jonah whose father has recently died, devastating his family. His mother’s subsequent grief and depression have left him and his older siblings caring for his younger ones, struggling to pay bills and attempting to hold together the family business. Into this world of cares and responsibilities Vivi comes like a whirlwind, or maybe a rainbow, since the particular brands of joy, fun and love she is offering extend not only to Jonah but to the rest of his family too. And in bringing the sunshine back into their lives, she also begins to expose the darkness that they are all living with, including Vivi herself.

Riding around town on her Vespa, Vivi lives up to just about every MPDG stereotype except one – unlike most of her kind she does have her own trajectory, her own story, her own journey to go on. This is assured by the clever use of the dual narrative, in which the two voices are distinct and through which we get a heartbreakingly intimate and wholly convincing first-person view of the struggles of living with bipolar disorder; the sheer colour and exhilaration of the highs (and the accompanying recklessness), versus the debilitating and inevitable self-destruction of the lows.

I literally read this book in a matter of days. This is one of those that end up responsible for a series of 2am bedtimes on my part. There was just something so compelling about these characters, their oh-so-normal and yet otherworldly setting, the sense of doom that hung over even their most star-filled, swooping and gorgeous moments. Honesty, truth and beautiful little nuggets of wisdom shine out of the rich and sumptuous prose and will stay with me, meaningfully, for a long time. I mean, it’s just so quotable I can’t even pick one to include; suffice it to say that the things it pointed out to me and made me consider left me feeling that this is a book everyone needs to read.

So I’ll end with an advisory: do not read this book unless you are prepared to be moved, to be surprised, to be compelled into staying up late to read one more chapter, to end up falling quite deeply in love with the characters, and to return from the journey it takes you on changed forever and for the better.

Book Review: Ariadnis

AriadnisFrom the start of this book, told in dual narrative from the perspectives of the Chosen Ones of two rival cities, we are coming at this unusual future dystopia from two distinct mirror-image angles. After some kind of schism in the philosophies that brought them to this post-apocalyptic point, the two societies have been heading in different directions. The vaguely steampunk city above has its ideas about where society should be heading, while that below is more focused on living in tune with nature.

Playing with the Chosen One tropes, we are presented with the super strength of Aula as set against the mute, unharnessed powers of Joomia. They have very little time remaining until the final test that will seemingly decide the fates of their respective worlds.

These worlds are distinct, unusual, fresh and well drawn. I felt I was entering a fictional future that was not as well trodden as some of them have become. Side characters were well employed and had good flesh on their bones; those designed to be likeable were just that, while dastardly villains didn’t disappoint. I don’t know if it’s just my interpretation, but I was a big fan of the androgynous, multi-racial qualities of most of the young cast. It’s a pretty nifty way of allowing all comers to the book to project themselves into and onto your story without turning into one of those super politically correct authors tripping over themselves to incorporate a rainbow into their narrative at its own expense. I don’t mean to come over cynical there (though I probably do) because I felt this aspect worked well, added to the atmosphere, and was entirely appropriate in the context.

What’s most clever and impressive about this debut however is the symmetry of the dual narrative. As I’ve said before, I’m not a big fan of these unless there is a reason for them, and in this case there certainly is. The way the stories of the two heroines intertwine – coming together, moving apart and ultimately colliding, is a smart piece of plotting and in itself a mirror (see what I did there) of the novel’s own themes.

Nicely done, and a pacey, involving read. Thanks to NetGalley and Hachette for the ARC.

Book Review: Our Chemical Hearts

Our Chemical HeartsWhen the immensely likeable, self-deprecating and sensitive Henry first encounters the enigmatic, damaged Grace, they are being made joint editors of their school newspaper. They build a tentative friendship, and Henry finds his feelings for her growing, but it soon becomes clear that Grace’s life has been complicated lately, and that this has taken its toll on her body and soul.

There’s quite a lot of YA books that deal with similar subject matter to that of Krystal Sutherland’s Our Chemical Hearts – first love, heartbreak, grief – but I have rarely seen them dealt with from so fresh a perspective. The real nuts and bolts, the most truthful of emotions, are sensitively depicted. There are no platitudes here. What’s more, each character is given the space to show their darkest and lightest sides (and every shade of grey in between). We are not presented with heroes and villains, or innocent victims – Grace, for example, is depicted as someone who is cruel and difficult, as well as someone who is deeply wounded by what has happened to her. The visceral pain of unrequited love, loving someone even when we know we shouldn’t, is all here, but treated with so light a touch that there is also space for lively, witty dialogue between the leads, and a great many warm and charming comedy moments from the quirky ensemble cast.

At times, Sutherland overlays a contemporary and familiar setting with some beautiful imagery, elevating ordinary suburban locations into something as ethereal and otherworldly as the philosophical questions posed in the themes of the book itself. There are a number of tonal shifts in the story, but not one of them seems abrupt or inappropriate. In fact, as with life, the collection of different moments, moods and emotions captured in this narrative come together into a compelling and mutually enriching whole, which is wistful, beautiful, thoughtful, truthful and sad, while also managing to be funny, unusual and irresistibly readable.

Book Review: Seven Days of You

sdoyThere is nothing like the last week in a country you’ve been living in for several years: the intensity of every moment, the burning desire to absorb every sight and sound, the constant postponement of final goodbyes, the sheer exhilaration that is mixed in with the fear and pain of everything that has made up your life disappearing around you.  I should know, I’ve done it several times in my life.  And this is the genius premise behind Cecilia Vinesse’s Seven Days of You, which I just devoured and am already missing.

It’s not just that her characters are unusual and well drawn and likeable (but they are), or that her Tokyo is so vividly described it literally leaves the taste of miso soup in your mouth (but it is), it’s also that her narrative is beautifully crafted around a literal countdown to the moment it must all end, so that we’re feeling every second that ticks by.  I love the peppering of Japanese throughout the prose and, despite having zero experience of the country, never felt disorientated by it.  Instead I felt like I was part of the cool Tokyo scene, heading off to karaoke, buying weird candy at the konbini, watching the sun rise over the neon galaxy of the cityscape.

SDOY is a gorgeous exploration of something that any long-term expat (or in fact anyone) can identify with – where is home?  Once you’ve been gone a certain amount of time from where you started, will anywhere ever really feel like home again?  But what even is this thing we call ‘home’ anyway?  Sensitive, gripping, beautiful – SDOY is an exhilarating, sparkly, all-night stroll through Tokyo, and I loved every minute.  

Many thanks to Little, Brown Books For Young Readers and NetGalley for the eARC.

Book Review: Optimists Die First

optimists-black-ukAs soon as I read the title of this I had to read it.  I mean, this is actually a philosophy I hold pretty dear.  I go into most situations expecting the worst – after all, that’s the only way to guarantee you’ll only be pleasantly surprised.  

But there’s a lot more to the path of Nielsen’s protagonist than pessimism.  She’s recovering from a horrible horrible tragedy, and doing it by pushing people away and approaching every situation with dread.  We see everywhere the tatters and echoes of a formerly happy life, which imploded the day her baby sister died.

There is a love story at the heart of this novel but at all times it feels like there is also a lot more.  Petula (great name!) is in the process of rebuilding her shattered soul piece by piece, and this means a lot more than just falling in love.  It’s about her friendships, her family, the things she used to love doing and all through the narrative these are woven together into a rich tapestry.

I love the quirky details of Petula’s world – the endless cats (and cat videos), the crafting and particularly the band of misfits at her art therapy group.  I’ve been in one of those myself actually and so I don’t think of this part of the story as far-fetched at all – they’re pretty interesting places.

What’s even better is that this isn’t all about the big happy ending; this is about the way people fight to survive, even when it seems impossible.  Inspiring, touching and funny by turns, Optimists Die First is a vivid and absorbing read.

Thanks to NetGalley for the eARC.